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Marsh Davis seated in Grand Hall at the Indiana Landmarks Center in Indianapolis. Submitted photo

PENDLETON — Historic Fall Creek, Pendleton Settlement Inc. is sponsoring a public program, “Investment Advantages of a Historic Building.”

The guest speaker is Marsh Davis, president of Indiana Landmarks, a statewide preservation organization. The event is to take place at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 28, at Gallery 119, 119 W. State St., Pendleton, courtesy of Pendleton Art Society.

Davis will share the latest data on the economic investment advantages of owning a historic building, whether for a business or home.

The settlement is an affiliate of Indiana Landmarks.

Davis earned a bachelor’s degree in history from Butler University and a master of science in historic preservation from Ball State University’s College of Architecture and Planning.

Prior to becoming president of Indiana Landmarks, he served as executive director of Galveston Historical Foundation.

Davis, as a photographer, teamed up with writer Bill Shaw to produce the book “99 Historic Homes in Indiana: A Look Inside.”

Pendleton’s own Grey Goose was chosen to be one of the 99.

In 1991, the entire town of Pendleton, 1991 town limits, was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Indiana Landmarks guided the settlement through the process of collecting data and writing a successful application.

Madison, Indiana, is the only other Indiana municipality that is entirely on the National Register of Historic Places.

The settlement will have historic and general plaques on display to help interested parties who would like to order one.

Memberships to Indiana Landmarks, Pendleton Artists Society and Historic Fall Creek, Pendleton Settlement will be available.

Snacks and drinks will be offered.

Marsh Davis is president of Indiana Landmarks, a preservation organization with more than 6,000 members and a network of field offices throughout the state.

He has bachelor’s degree in history from Butler University and an Master’s of Science degree in historic preservation from Ball State University’s College of Architecture and Planning.

He previously served as executive director of the Galveston Historical Foundation.

He has served as a trustee of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

For his work in historic preservation, Davis was named a Sagamore of the Wabash by Gov. Frank O’Bannon.

Davis lives with his wife, Grace, in the 1873 Kemper House in Indianapolis’ historic St. Joseph neighborhood.

They have two daughters who live in Texas and Pennsylvania.